Artists–J

Lambert [Lambrecht] Jacobsz.`

Dutch Mennonite preacher who worked primarily as painter and also as an art dealer; born Amsterdam (ca 1598), died Leeuwarden (1636); father of the artist Abraham van den Tempel; teacher of Govert Flinck and Jacob Backer.

  • Old Woman Playing a Flute, oil on canvas, 69.8 × 62.8 cm, circle of Lambert Jacobsz. (ca 1598–1636). London: Christies, Live Auction 9433, Old Master Pictures, 12/07/2002, Lot 23 (sold) Ref. Gabrius Data Bank (2007, col.); Website: Mutual Art (2002, col.)  A very old woman plays a cylindrical recorder, the hole for the little finger of her lowermost (left) hand clearly visible.

Igor von Jakimow

Russian immigrant to Germany where he taught in Berlin; born Polotjohnoje, Russia (1885), died Heidelberg (1962).

  • The Flute Player (ca 1950), watercolour and ink on paper, 28.6 × 22.3 cm, Igor von Jakimow (1885–1962). Heidelberg: Kurpfälzisches Museum, Inv. Z 4588. Ref. Munich RIdIM (2003, HDkm 151); Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2003). A young man, standing, plays a cylindrical duct flute held high in the air to a young woman who is seated. Both completely naked.

Janos Janko

Hungarian painter and graphic artist; known for his typical cartoon figures, some 70,000 drawings, and genre paintings; born Tótkomlós (1833), died Budapest (1896).

  • The Birth of the Folk-Song Janos Janko (1833-1896) Budapest: Magyar Nemzeti Galeria. Ref. Bridgeman Art Library (2003: Image BAL47883, col.) Watched by an admiring crowd of his fellows, a shepherd sits playing a slender cylindrical pipe, probably a kaval rather than a duct flute.

Abraham I Janssens [Jansens] (van Nuyssen)

Flemish painter whose early work is in the Mannerist idiom, but who later came to paint in a powerful, monumental style; born and died Antwerp (1567/76–1632).

  • Pan and his Pipe, wood, 52 × 73 cm, Abraham I Janssens (ca 1567/76–1632). Location unknown; formerly Antwerp: Stuyck Collection. Ref. Leppert (1977: 70). A country bacchanal in which the figure of Pan plays a recorder.
  • Flute Player and Girl, painting, Abraham I Janssens (ca 1567/76–1632). Location unknown; formerly Vienna: Matzvansky Collection (1943). Ref. Nicolson (1979: p. 130 & fig. 1392); Universitatario Olandese di Storia dell’Arte Firenze, Special Photo Study Collections, Image 0001559 (2009, b&w). Watched by a young woman, a shepherd in a straw hat holds a pipe (flute or recorder), right hand uppermost.

Adele Jaunn

Contemporary Australian artist living in Adelaide; specialising in children’s book illustration; born Bergen, Norway (1976).

  • Eight Lizards
    • Cassandra (2004), postcard, 15 × 10 cm, Adele Jaunn (1976–) Ref. Postcard: Orpheus Music, Australia. A brown lizard plays a neo-baroque basset recorder.
    • Margaret (2004), postcard, 15 × 10 cm, Adele Jaunn (1976–) Ref. Postcard: Orpheus Music, Australia. A brown and blue lizard with white spots holds a new-baroque recorder.
    • Marion (2004), postcard, 10 × 15 cm, Adele Jaunn (1976–) Ref. Postcard: Orpheus Music, Australia. A purple lizard sits cross-legged, a neo-baroque basset recorder in one hand, a manual in the other.
    • Franz (2004), postcard, 15 × 10 cm, Adele Jaunn (1976–) Ref. Postcard: Orpheus Music, Australia. A green and blue lizard with white spots holds a neo-baroque tenor recorder.
    • Ralph (2004), postcard, 10 × 15 cm,Adele Jaunn (1976–) Ref. Postcard: Orpheus Music, Australia. A brown and blue lizard holds a neo-baroque recorder in each hand.
    • Cedric (2004), postcard, 10 × 15 cm, Adele Jaunn (1976–) Ref. Postcard: Orpheus Music, Australia. A green lizard holds a modern recorder in one hand, a sheaf of music manuscript in the other.
    • Jimmy (2004), postcard, 10 × 15 cm, Adele Jaunn (1976–) Ref. Postcard: Orpheus Music, Australia. A little brown lizard with white stripes and a blue head holds a modern recorder which he is about to play.
    • Friends (2004), postcard, 15 × 10 cm, Adele Jaunn (1976–) Ref. Postcard: Orpheus Music, Australia. Two brown lizards sit back to back playing neo-baroque recorders.

Pierre Jaquet-Droz

Celebrated Swiss clock, watch and automaton maker, active in Basle, Neuchâtel, Paris, Geneva and Madrid; in addition to clocks his creations include mechanical birds and dolls, some of which are, in effect, programmable (they predate Babbage’s work) born Chax-de-Fonds (1721), died (1790).

  • The Shepherd, desktop carved and gilded bronze clock, 150 × 57 × 24 cm, Pierre Jaquet-Droz (1721–1790). Madrid: Palacio Real, Gasparino Room 8, on a mantelpiece. Ref. Colon de Carvajal (1987: cat. 10, pl.); Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2001). “At the top of this beautiful, charming clock are a porcelain shepherd, his dog and a sheep, all beneath a tree. The shepherd plays a late baroque-type recorder of alto/tenor size, in a black material. The beak, window/labium, bell end and decorative rings are all clear; but the finger holes are all covered, with the right hand lower and the little finger down in perfect recorder playing position. The clock plays the hours, with a miniature music box. The shepherd moves his fingers; the sheep bleats and shakes its tail; the dog barks” (Rowland-Jones, loc. cit.)

Etienne Jeaurat

French painter and draughtsman; a history painter, many of his designs were made into tapestries at the Gobelins; born Paris (1699), died Versailles (1789).

  • The Rehearsal, oil on canvas, 83.8 × 119.4 cm, Etienne Jeaurat (1699–789). Private Collection. Ref. Bridgeman Art Library (2002: Image GG 101965, col.) A family group sing and play flute and oboe while a little dog dances. A cello leans unplayed against a stool. The Bridgeman Art Library index the oboe as a recorder, in error. This painting has a pendant entitled The Concert in the same collection.

Nicolas-Henri Jeaurat de Bertry [Bertrix]

French artist known for his portraits, landscapes and still-lifes, excelling at the latter; born Paris (1728), died Vermenton (1796); son of the engraver Edme Jeaurat and nephew of the painter Etienne Jeaurat (1699–1789).

  • Memento Mori, oil on canvas, 72.5 × 91.0 cm, Nicolas-Henri Jeaurat de Bertry (1728–796). Nancy: Musée de Beaux Arts. Ref. Forneris & Debrabandère-Descamps (1991: 64–65); Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm, 2003); Website: gallica (2012, b&w). A vanitas with the usual objects, including a globe, books, shells, a skull, fruit, a straight trumpet, and a rather square-headed alto recorder with eight finger holes in line, the bell end hidden by a book.

Thomas Jenkins (ca 1720–1798), British engraver – see James McArdell (1728/29–1765)

Janet Jizba

Contemporary US artist; sister in law of Richie Henzler, proprietor of Courtly Music Unlimted.

  • Christmas Cards (1993), Janet Jizba (contemporary). Ref. Website: Courtly Music Unlimited (2002). Four separate cards depict a boy playing a stylised recorder underneath a Christmas tree, an angel playing a recorder, Santa Claus with a parcel atop of which a toy clown blows a stylised recorder, and a shepherd playing a recorder.
  • Animal Note Cards (1992), Janet Jizba (contemporary). Ref. Website:Courtly Music Unlimited (2002). Four separate cards depict a bear, a bird (one of five perched on a telegraph wire), a dragon and a kangaroo with a joey in her pouch playing recorders.
  • Snowman, Janet Jizba (contemporary). Ref. Website:Courtly Music Unlimited (2002). A snowman plays a recorder.
  • Father and Son, Janet Jizba (contemporary). Ref. Website:Courtly Music Unlimited (2002). A father, his son and a teddy bear stride out with their recorders and music books.
  • Elf, Janet Jizba (contemporary). Ref. Website:Courtly Music Unlimited (2002). An elf with a pointed hat and curly shoes plays a recorder.
  • Teacher, Janet Jizba (contemporary). Ref. Website:Courtly Music Unlimited (2002). An elf with a pointed hat and curly shoes plays a recorder.
  • Thumbrests, Janet Jizba (contemporary). Ref. Website:Courtly Music Unlimited (2002). A cartoon in which one recorder player says to another “You need a clip on thumb-rest. Let’s go to Courtly Music”. Each player holds an instrument.
  • Fall Couple, Janet Jizba (contemporary). Ref. Website:Courtly Music Unlimited (2002). A couple play recorders beneath a maple tree dropping its leaves. Doubtless this represents Richie and and Elaine Henzler, proprietors of Courtly Music Unlimited.

Joseph Jobin (18th century), French

  • Trophy (1756–1761), carved wooden panel, Joseph Jobin (18th century). Morteau: Eglise Notre Dame de l’Assumption, side panel in front of the pews, at the entrance to the choir. Ref. H. Meunier (1908); Website: Iconographie de la cornamuse en France (2006). A trophy of musical instruments: horn, trumpet, cornamuse (bagpipe), and a three-piece baroque recorder. One of a pair of trophies, the other with lute, harp and viol. Curiously, the bagpipe has a mouthpiece shaped like the beak of a recorder.

Harry Jochmus (1855–1915), German

  • A Song of Springtime (1895), painting, Harry Jochmus (1855–1915). Location unknown. Ref. Munsey’s Magazine (1895, b&w); Rijksbureau voor Kunsthistorische Documentatie (2001); Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2001); eBay (2013: item 230354900713). Against a background of goats and sea, under a flowering cherry, a seated male Arcadian plays a pipe to his female companion lying on a rug. The pipe is narrow at the mouthpiece; there is no window/labium and little bell flare; the players fingers are in recorder-playing position and two finger holes are visible.

Johann (Hans)

German artist and follower of Lucas Cranach; active early 16th century.

  • The Ninth Commandment (1528–1529), tempera on conifer wood panel, 137.0 × 86.5 cm, Johann (16th century). Dresden: Städtische Galerie, Inv 1968/40. Archiv Moeck; Rowland-Jones (1999b: 6–7, fig. 5, b&w). One of a series of representations of the biblical Commandments created for the Dresdner Kreuzkirche. The image sequence with its realistic scenes of urban life is one of the rare examples of sophisticated Dresdner panel painting of this period. The subject in this panel is covetousness. Down in the street, three finely dressed musicians serenade a couple on the balcony above. Clearly distressed, the husband points querulously at a dog (a symbol of loyalty) who is growling in protest at the musicians.  One of the trio plays a lute, another a mute cornetto, and the third plays a slender duct flute (probably a recorder), the window-labium clearly depicted.  Striding toward the the musicians, an extravagantly dressed fopp appears to be drawing his sword. And from a safe distance across the road, another man watches the unfolding drama from a balcony window. The wife seems to be thoroughly enjoying being the centre of all this male attention!

F[rançois] Jollain (fl. ca 1601–1673), French

  • Frontispiece: Jacques Champion de Chambonnières, Pieces de Clavecin (ca 1601–1670): Instruments of Music (1670), engraving, F. Jollain (fl. ca 1601–1673). Ref. Kinsky, G. (1930); Paris RIdIM (1999). Above a harpsichord and a virginals hangs a banner with the title and publishers information held up by two putti. Hanging on a wall behind are musical instruments including a viol, lute, guitar, and a garland of shawm, cornetto, and a pipe which may be a recorder. The atelier Jollain was responsible for the first engraving of harpsichord music in France, from which this engraving comes.

Jacob I Jordaens

Flemish Baroque etcher and painter of boisterous scenes of peasant life, sensuous allegories, mythological and religious subjects, and group portraits; born and died Antwerp (1593–1678).

  • Three Itinerant Musicians, oil on panel, 49 × 64 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Madrid: Museo del Prado, Inv. PO1550. Ref. Recorder & Music 3 (7): cover (1970); Ibañez & Gallego (1972: 169–171, fig., b&w); Hulst (1982: 105, fig. 73, col.); El Museo del Prado (1990); Website: gallica (2012, b&w). Three peasants, two of whom sing whilst the third plays a slender flared-bell recorder with a decorated beak.
  • Three Itinerant Musicians, oil on canvas, after Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Besançon: Musée des Beaux Arts et d’Archéologie. Ref. JMA (1969: 236, fig. 33); Leppert (1977: pl. 87); Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2008). A study depicting three peasants, two of whom sing whilst the third plays a recorder (seven finger holes visible). This is possibly from Jordaen’s own workshop.
  • Three Musicians, canvas, 109 × 105 cm, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). London: Earl of Yarborough Collection. Ref. Leppert (1977: pl. 65); Website: gallica (2012, b&w). Three street musicians play bagpipe, cylindrical duct flute (flageolet or recorder, though no finger holes are visible), and an indeterminate wind instrument.
  • Three Musicians, oil on canvas, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Location unknown: Auctioned by Christie’s, 8 December 1994 (sold). Ref. Gabrius Data Bank (2002, col.) Three street musicians (the same as in Three Musicians, Earl of Yarborough Collection, London) play bagpipe, cylindrical duct flute (flageolet or recorder, though no finger holes are visible), and an indeterminate wind instrument.
  • Serenade, oil on canvas, 114 × 166 cm, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). London: Christies, 24 April 2001, Lot 49 (sold); formerly Antwerp: Léon Lebion Collection. Ref. Leppert (1977: pl. 64); Gabrius Data Bank (2001, col.); Christies Catalogue (April 2001: 67, pl.); Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2001); Rijksbureau voor Kunsthistoriche Documentatie 65924 (2010, col.) Three instrumentalists (the same as in Three Musicians, Earl of Yarborough Collection, London) playing a conical duct flute (possibly a recorder) with a small window/labium and four finger holes visible, bagpipe, and an indeterminate wind instrument accompanying a young singer and a dog. The recorder player is said to be a self-portrait of Jordaens himself.
  • Satyr Playing the Flute (ca 1620), panel 65 × 49.5 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Warsaw: Muzeum Narodowe, Inv. 129029. Ref. Hulst (1982: 100, fig. 64, b&w); Rijksbureau voor Kunsthistorische Documentatie, Image  0000017587 (2001); Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2001). A satyr plays a cylindrical pipe which might be interpreted as a recorder played right hand lowermost. No window-labium is visible
  • Satyr Playing the Flute (ca 1630-1645), canvas, 125 × 176 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum, Inv. SK-A-198. Ref. D’Hulst et al. (1993: 150); Archiv Moeck. A young satyr, wreathed with vine leaves and holding a duct flute (probably a recorder, since the lowermost little finger seems to be covering a hole), smiles at the viewer. The crook behind him identifies him as a shepherd. Directly in front of him, a small goat nibbles on some leaves while sheep and a ram can be seen further into the background. The painting seems to be simply an evocation of a carefree, pastoral existence with a reference to fertility and a jovial dash of eroticism. A contemorary copy is at Windsor Castle CWLF 39 (see below).
  • Satyr Playing the Flute (ca 1645-1660), canvas, 129.5 × 200.7 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Windsor: Castle, CWLF 39. A young satyr, wreathed with vine leaves and holding a duct flute (probably a recorder, since the lowermost little finger seems to be covering a hole), smiles at the viewer. The crook behind him identifies him as a shepherd. Directly in front of him, a small goat nibbles on some leaves while sheep and a ram can be seen further into the background. The painting seems to be simply an evocation of a carefree, pastoral existence with a reference to fertility and a jovial dash of eroticism. A contemporary copy of a painting at Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam SK-A-198 (see above).
  • Satyr Playing the Flute, canvas, 100 × 150 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Bilbao: Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao. Ref. D’Hulst et al. (1993: 150, fig. A43a); Archiv Moeck. A horned and bearded satyr sits in a landscape with a few goats playing a flared-bell recorder with seven finger holes and the shadow of the window/labium visible. The instrument appears to made in four parts.
  • Old Satyr Holding a Flute, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Stockholm: Nationalmuseum, NM 489. Ref. Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2000). The blowing end of the Satyr’s pipe (probably a recorder) may be hidden in his beard, but there is no sign of a beak or window/labium. The instrument expands slightly towards the somewhat flared bell end, and the lower fingers of the left hand are close to the bottom. The first and little fingers of the left hand are raised. All fingers of the right hand are down. No finger holes show. Notes by Rowland-Jones (loc. cit.)
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns” (1638), canvas 120 × 192 cm., Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Antwerp: Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Cat. 677. Ref. Lepert (1977: pl. 75); Hulst (1982: 167, fig. 137 , col.); Bridgeman Art Library (2002: Image XIR61059, col.); Ausoni (2009: 182–183, col.); Website: gallica (2012, col.) Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb drawn from a collection of sayings assembled by Jacob Cats. A bourgeois family amuse themselves around the dinner table. Two youngsters, one on his mother’s lap, are playing small duct flutes, one possibly intended to be a recorder, the other with small pellet-bells attached and thus probably a toy whistle. Their father, standing, plays a bagpipe, their grandparents sing at the top of their lungs following the music on a sheet of paper and a score, and their grandpa conducts. The family dog, with his ears pricked up, sniffs at the remains of food on the table.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns” (1638), Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Arens Collection. Ref. Lepert (1977: 75). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which serenading musicians sing and play guitar, and a child plays a small duct flute (only three finger holes visible).
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns” (1638-1640), canvas, 153 × 290 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Valenciennes: Musée des Beaux Arts, Cat. 73 (on loan from the Louvre). Ref. JMA (1969: 229, fig. 26); Leppert (1977: 77); Hulst (1982: fig. 138, b&w). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb which shows three young children playing small duct flutes (possibly intended to be recorders); a man plays a bagpipe; two women sing.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns” (1638-1640), canvas, 154 × 2-8 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Paris: Louvre. Ref. Website: gallica (2012, b&w). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb which shows a family around the dinner table entertained by a bagpipe player and a small child tooting a very small duct flute to a watching dog.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns” (1645), 145.5 × 218 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Ottawa: National Gallery of Canada. Ref. Hulst (1982: 184, fig. 184 , col.); Sutton (1993: 352–355); Website: gallica (2012, b&w). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb which depicts three generations of the artist’s own family! Two young children play small duct flutes (possibly intended to be recorders); a man plays a slender conical duct flute (possibly intended to be a a recorder); others sing. The sheet the woman is holding reads Een Nieu Leideken van Calloo Die Geusen – “A New Song from Caloo, the Beggars.’ Here, “beggars”, implies “rebels”, the term used in Flanders to refer to the Protestant forces. This is a topical reference to the battle at Kallo on 20 June 1638, which saw the defeat of the Protestant Dutch force which had invaded Catholic Flanders. Looking beyond the religious significance, the song would have had resonance with a local audience, as the Dutch were intent on seizing Antwerp. Among the many hidden meanings in this work is the parrot, symbolizing the stupidity of repeating without understanding, while its opposite, the owl, stands for wisdom, night, and death. The flowers, the snuffed-out candle, and the withered pages are further symbols of mortality.
  • Head of a Man Playing a Recorder, black and red chalk with white chalk highlights on paper, 14.3 × 13.9 cm. Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Besançon: Musée des Beaux-arts et d’Archéologie.  Ref. Website: flickr, Peter’s photostream (2017, col.) Only one study convincingly made for the Ottawa painting (above) survives; it shows the head of the man playing the duct flute (possibly a recorder).
  • Family Concert [“As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”], Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Brussels: Galerie d’Arenberg. Ref. Leppert (1977: 76, pl. 74, b&w). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb which shows two child musicians playing small duct flutes (possibly recorders); Dad plays the bagpipes; and the grandparents sing.
  • Family Concert [“As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”], Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Brussels: Caveno Collection. Ref. Leppert (1977: pl. 75). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which two musicians sing whilst a third plays a small duct flute (possibly recorder, though only three finger holes are visible].
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Dresden: Staatliche Kunstsammlungen – Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Cat. 1014. Ref. Leppert (1977: pl. 76). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which musicians sing, another plays a bagpipe, a child plays a small duct flute (possibly a recorder), another plays a whistle.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Ghent: A. de Pannemaecker Collection. Ref. Leppert (1977: pl. 75). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which musicians sing, another plays a bagpipe, a child plays a duct flute (only four finger holes visible) and another plays a whistle with a pellet-bell attached.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, canvas, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Gosford House: Earl of Wymyss Collection, Inv. 275. Ref. JMA (1969: 232, fig. 28); Leppert (1977: pl. 77). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which a man plays an ambiguous pipe (mute cornetto or recorder), one child holds and another plays a small duct flute (flageolets or recorders), and two women sing.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, canvas, 169 × 240 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Van Renynge de Voxurie Collection. Ref. Leppert (1977: pl. 77). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which a man plays a bagpipe, three children play small duct flutes (flageolets or recorders), and a man and two women sing.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Van Wiele Collection. Ref. Leppert (1977: pl. 77). Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which a man plays a bagpipe, two children play small duct flutes (flageolets or recorders, one with two pellet bells attached), and a man and a women sing.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, oil on canvas, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Ref. Gabrius Data Bank (2002, col.) Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which a man plays a bagpipe, two children play small duct flutes (flageolets or recorders; one cylindrical, the other flared), and an old man and and elderly woman sing. A dog look expectantly at the food on the table in the foreground. Very similar to the version below, but reversed and in this one there is no owl.
  • As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns, oil on canvas, 211 × 189 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Location: Private Collection. Ref. Bridgeman Art Library (2003: Image MHB90666, col.) Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which a man plays a bagpipe, two children play small duct flutes (flageolets or recorders; one cylindrical, the other flared), and an old man and and elderly woman sing. A dog look expectantly at the food on the table in the foreground. Very similar to the above version, but reversed and in this one an owl sits above the old woman’s wicker chair.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, oil on canvas, 78.741 × 109.22 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Madrid: Fernando Duran, 13 October 1999, Lot 348. Ref. Brouin Art Sales Index (2012, col.), as “Banquet with Musicians” Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which a man plays a bagpipe, two children play small duct flutes (flageolets or recorders; one cylindrical, the other flared), and an old man and and elderly woman sing.
  • “Sou D’oude Songen Sou Pepen de Jongen” [As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns], print, 33.3 × 44.7 cm, engraved by Cornelis Danckerts (1603–1656), after Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Washington DC: Library of Congress, Dayton C. Miller Flute Collection, 0082/Y. Ref. Early Music News 83: cover (1985). Identical to the engraving by Bolswert below, but reversed. Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which an old woman in a wicker chair and an old man opposite her sing across a table laden with the remains of a meal, a younger man plays a huge bagpipe and two small children play whistles. The youngest child sitting on its mother’s laps plays a cylindrical whistle which may be a recorder, given that the little finger of the lowermost (right) hand appears to be covering a finger hole. The older child’s instrument has a flared bell and clearly depicted window/labium and he also seems to be covering a vent with the little finger of his lowermost (right) hand, so this too is probably a recorder. The old man is probably the painter Adam Van Noort, Jordaens’s teacher and father-in-law. Beneath a caption reads:

    What the elders frequently sing with wide-open mouths,
    the cautious youngsters strive to re-echo on their pipes.
    Zeuxis depicted this well, and would have surpassed art,
    If life were to come to the aged ones, and sound to the pipes.

  • “Sou D’oude Songen Sou Pepen de Jongen” [As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns] (1638), print, 33.5 × 46.2 cm, engraved by Justus Danckerts (1635–1701), after Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum, Inv. RP-P-1939-157; Antwerp: Museum Plantin-Moretus, Prentenkabinet PK.OP.18381 | IV/D.23. Identical to the above but reversed. Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which an old woman in a wicker chair and an old man opposite her sing across a table laden with the remains of a meal, a younger man plays a huge bagpipe and two small children play whistles. The youngest child sitting on its mother’s laps plays a cylindrical whistle which may be a recorder, given that the little finger of the lowermost (right) hand appears to be covering a finger hole. The older child’s instrument has a flared bell and clearly depicted window/labium and he also seems to be covering a vent with the little finger of his lowermost (right) hand, so this too is probably a recorder. Beneath a caption reads:

    What the elders frequently sing with wide-open mouths,
    the cautious youngsters strive to re-echo on their pipes.
    Zeuxis depicted this well, and would have surpassed art,
    If life were to come to the aged ones, and sound to the pipes.

  • “Sou D’oude Songen Sou Pepen de Jongen” [As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns] (1638), print, 33.5 × 46.2 cm, engraved by Schelte Adamsz. Bolswert (c.1586–1659), after Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Amsterdam: Rijksmuseum, Inv. RP-P-1939-157. Identical to the above but reversed. Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which an old woman in a wicker chair and an old man opposite her sing across a table laden with the remains of a meal, a younger man plays a huge bagpipe and two small children play whistles. The youngest child sitting on its mother’s laps plays a cylindrical whistle which may be a recorder, given that the little finger of the lowermost (right) hand appears to be covering a finger hole. The older child’s instrument has a flared bell and clearly depicted window/labium and he also seems to be covering a vent with the little finger of his lowermost (right) hand, so this too is probably a recorder. Beneath a caption reads:

    What the elders frequently sing with wide-open mouths,
    the cautious youngsters strive to re-echo on their pipes.
    Zeuxis depicted this well, and would have surpassed art,
    If life were to come to the aged ones, and sound to the pipes.

  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, oil on canvas, 144.78 × 78.00 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Amsterdam: Christies, Old Master Pictures (Sale Schneebert), 6 May 1998, Lot 115. Ref. Brouin Art Sales Index (2012, col.) Around a table laden with food an old man sings from a broadsheet, two very young children tootle duct flutes (possibly recorders), an old woman (standing) strokes a cat, and other members of the family join in the singing, one leaning in through a hatch. A dog in the foreground left is showing great interest in the food; a parrot on a perch in the background right squawks in alarm.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, oil on canvas, 165.0 × 93.31 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Paris: Piasa, 26 June 2009, Lot 15. Ref. Blouin Art Sales Index (2012, col.) Allegory illustrating a Flemish proverb in which an old man sings from a sheet of paper, his wife from a part-book, a young man plays the bagpipe, and two children play small duct flutes, possibly recorders. Other members of the family join in, when poking his head through a window. A distressed dog leans against one of the young pipers’ knees.
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, painting, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Locality unknown. Ref. Website: gallica (2012, b&w, as Repas musical). Around a table laden with food an old man and woman sing from a broadsheet, a young child tootles a duct flute (possibly a recorder), a woman with an infant on her lap keeps her eye on a dog that in turn is gazing up at a parrot perched on a chair, another dog in the foreground left is showing great interest in the food; a man standing in the background plays a bagpipe;
  • “As the old ones sing, so also the young ones pipe; As the old Cock crows, the young one learns”, red & black chalk, grey wash & brown ink on paper, 14.6 × 17.9 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Stuttgart: Staatsgalerie, Inv. C 1951/323. Ref. ? Research Centre for Musical Iconography (1978: 14, item 78, attributed to Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)). Grandparents, parents, children, two musicians and a dog are gathered huddled next to a table. With short, almost sketchy strokes that people are characterized live fully, the light of the great lantern creates a friendly intimate atmosphere. Several of the company sing and play recorder, violin and bass viol.
  • Quod cantant veteres, tentat resonare iuventus (1640), tapestry, designed by Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Detail. Tarragona: Museu Diocesà. Ref. Rowland-Jones (1997c: 11, fig. 15a&b, b&w, detail); Website: gallica (2012, b&w). Shows a boy playing what may be a narrow, flared-bell recorder, a man plays the bagpipes, a fat man sings and beats time, a babe in arms plays a whistle of some kind; at the bottom of the tapestry a pile of instruments includes what may be more recorders.
  • The Triumph of Bacchus (ca 1645), oil on canvas, 204 × 163 cm, Jacob I Jordaens(1593–1678). Kassel: Schloss Wilhelmshöhe, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, GK 109. Ref. Leppert (1977: 84); Hulst (1982: fig. 181, col.); Munich RIdIM (2002: Kksg – 560). Bacchus is surrounded by his companions. A satyr plays the timbrel; an infant plays a small duct flute (possibly a recorder) with one hand.
  • The Triumph of Bacchus (ca 1645), canvas, 175 × 145 cm, Jacob I Jordaens(1593–1678). Arras: Musée des Beaux-Arts, Cat. 209. Ref. Leppert (1977: 84). A copy of the original in the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Kassel. A bacchante plays the timbrel; an infant plays a small duct flute (possibly a recorder) with one hand.
  • Diana resting with Nymphs, Satyrs and Booty (ca 1645), canvas 205 × 255 cm, Jacob I Jordaens(1593–1678). Location unknown: formerly Tony Dreyfus Collection, Paris. Ref. Hulst (1982: 201, fig. 179, b&w). One of the satyrs plays a duct flute (possibly a recorder).
  • Adoration of the Shepherds, wood, 64.5 × 51.5 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Antwerp: Museum Mayer van den Bergh, cat. 178. Ref. Leppert (1977: 72, pl. 83). A rustic nativity scene in a barn in which a shepherd serenades the holy family with a small, rough-hewn duct flute (possibly a recorder).
  • Adoration of the Shepherds, oil on canvas, 147.5 × 117.5 cm, Jacob Jordaens (1593–1678). London: Christie’s, Important Old Master Pictures, 21 April 1989. Ref. Sale Catalogue, Christie’s (1989: 91, col.) A rustic nativity scene in a barn in which a shepherd serenades the holy family with a small, rough-hewn duct flute (possibly a recorder).
  • Adoration of the Shepherds, engraving by Marin Robin van der Goes (ca 1599–639) after Jacob Jordaens (1593–1678). Washington DC.: Library of Congress, Dayton C. Miller Flute Collection. Ref. Recorder & Music 5 (4): cover (1975); Jan Lancaster ex Robert Bigio (pers. comm, 2007). Signed ‘Mariuus’ but presumably ‘Marinus’, a pseudonym of Marin Robin van der Goes. Reproduces Jordaens’ painting auctioned by Christie’s, London (21 April 1989, see above). A motto beneath reads:

    Nectare; et ambrosia ciues qui Pascit Sympi
    Pas Forum vili Pascitur ecce cibo.

    Quem canit keroâ Diuorum Voce Senatus,
    Hunc canit en gracili rustica musa sono.

  • The Bean Feast, (1630-1660), oil on canvas, 243 × 373 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Kassel: Schloss Wilhelmshöhe, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Inv. GK 108. Ref. Weber (undated); Munich RIdIM (2009, Kksg – 90); Website: gallica (2012, b&w), detail. At the table, the king drinks and an old man with glasses and a red cap holds a cylindrical recorder with a very slight flare at the bell. The wide bore is clearly visible with quite thin walls at the bell-end opening.
  • Flute Player, attributed to Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Location unknown. Ref. Instituto Universitatario Olandese di Storia dell’Arte Firenze, Special Photo Study Collections, Image 0044094 (2009, b&w); Website: gallica (2012, b&w). An old man wearing a cap and an unusual 3-pointed beard holds a cylindrical pipe. His fingers are deployed as if for recorder-playing and there appears to be a vent for the little finger of the lowermost 9right) hand, but no details of the window/labium are visible. Another man places his hand on the musician’s shoulder. The principal figure here is very much like the bespectacled elderly recorder player in The Bean Feast (Kassel), for which see above.
  • Flute Player, canvas, 81.5 × 68.5 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Paris: Musée Galliera, 21 March 1969, Cat. No. 171. Ref. Paris RIdIM (1999). An old, toothless man with a ragged beard holds a cylindrical duct flute (flageolet or recorder) with an indeterminate number of finger holes. He is very similar to the recorder player depicted in The Bean Feast (Kassel), though here he has a hat made of plaited straw.
  • Flute Player, canvas, 93 × 90 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Paris: Bank de Paris et des Pays Bas. Ref. Paris RIdIM (1999). An old, toothless man with a ragged beard holds a cylindrical duct flute (flageolet or recorder) with an indeterminate number of finger holes. He is very similar to the recorder player depicted in The Bean Feast (Kassel), though here he has a hat made of plaited straw. A companion has her arms around his shoulder and a dog looks up at him, his mouth open.
  • Mercury and Argus (1634–1640), oil on wood panel, 49.3 × 64.5 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Melbourne: National Gallery of Victoria, 1996.658 Ref. Website: National Gallery of Victoria (2001). Other versions in Dilbeek and Munich (see below). Argus leans wearily on his staff, his cows gazing meekly behind him. Mercury (Hermes) reaches for his knife, his bone pipe cast aside. The pipe is a probably a duct flute, given the hint of a window/labium, but only five finger holes are visible.
  • Mercury and Argus, oil on canvas, after Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Ref. Gabrius Data Bank (2000, b&w). Argus leans wearily on his staff, watched by his dog, his cows gazing meekly behind him. Mercury (Hermes) reaches for his knife, his bone pipe cast aside. The pipe is a probably a duct flute, given the hint of a window/labium and the flared bell. A crude version (perhaps a copy) of the painting in the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.
  • Mercury and Argus, oil on canvas, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Ref. Gabrius Data Bank (2000, col.) Argus leans wearily on his staff, watched by his dog, his cows gazing meekly behind him. Mercury (Hermes) reaches for his knife, his bone pipe cast aside. The pipe is a probably a duct flute, given the hint of a beak, window/labium, and flared bell. A version (in reverse) of the painting in the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.
  • Mercury and Argus, canvas, 50 × 70 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Munich: Galleria Silvano Lodi & Due. Ref. Paris RIdIM (1999). Other versions in Dilbeek, Lyon, Melbourne and Dilbeek. Argus leans wearily on his staff, his cows gazing meekly behind him and his dog sits beside him. Mercury reaches for his knife, his bone pipe cast aside. The pipe is a probably a duct flute, given the hint of a window/labium, but only five finger holes are visible.
  • Mercury and Argus, canvas, 142 × 170 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Dilbeek: Collection R.A. d’Hulst. Ref. Paris RIdIM (1999). Other versions in Melbourne, Munich and Lyon. Argus leans wearily on his staff, his cows gazing meekly behind him and his dog sits beside him. Mercury reaches for his knife, his bone pipe cast aside. The pipe is a probably a duct flute, given the hint of a window/labium, but only five finger holes are visible.
  • Mercury and Argus, oil on canvas, 202 × 241 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Lyon: Musée des Beaux-Arts, Inv. H679. Ref. Joconde Website (1999); Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2003); Website: gallica (2012, b&w). Other versions in Dilbeek, Melbourne and Munich. Argus leans wearily on his staff, his cows gazing meekly behind him and his dog sits beside him. Mercury reaches for his knife, his bone pipe cast aside. The pipe is a probably a duct flute, given the hint of a window/labium, but only five finger holes are visible.
  • Mercury and Argus (ca 1707), tile picture, 305 cm × 171 cm (23×13 = 299 tiles), Willem van der Kloet, after Jacob Jordaens (1593–1678). Private Collection: offered for sale by Walstra, Bolsward, Netherlands (2000). Ref. Website: Walstra BV (2000). After the painting Mercury and Argus, by the Antwerp painter Jacob Jordeans (completed in the early 1620’s, used to be housed in the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Lyon), painted in blue, depicting Argus the herdsman who sits recumbent against a gnarled tree flanked by a seated hound before a group of heifers and bulls. Argus has been lulled to sleep by Mercury, using his pipe (of which only a single hole is visible and thus either a flute or a recorder viewed from behind) cast aside at his feet across a fleshy-leaved herb, in order to cut off his head to release Io, who was transformed by Jupiter into a white heifer. All within a landscape enhanced by trees and loose cloud work surrounded by a palmette border, comprising 299 tiles.This unique tile picture (there is only one in the world!) was produced at the ‘family company’ De Twee Romeinen the work place of Willein van der Kloet (1666–1747) and his Younger brother Corilelis (1672–1733). Situated on both the Prinsengracht and the Anjelierstraat. De Twee Romeinen proved itself to be the most important centre for tile production of this period. Expansive tile pictures of the highest quality were produced here, many sent to Portugal.
  • Hermes, Argus and Io, engraving by Schelte Bolswert (ca 1581–1659) after Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Dordrecht: Museum. Ref. Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2001). On the ground is a duct flute with its characteristic window/labium and five finger holes.
  • Acts of the Apostles [Saints Paul and Barnabas at Lystra] Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Location unknown. Ref. Leppert (1977: 72). Peasant children (or putti) play a small duct flute-flute with three finger holes visible, and an ambiguous, conical wind instrument.
  • Allegory of Poetry, canvas, 165 × 117 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Location unknown. Ref. Leppert (1977: 73). Muses and mythological figures play music in a garden: Apollo plays the lyre; the muses play viols; two putti play ambiguous conical wind-instruments (probably recorders).
  • Cortege of Bacchus, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Langeveld Collection. Ref. Leppert (1977: 74). A countryside bacchanal in which a man plays a timbrel and a child plays a small recorder.
  • Diogenes Looking for an Honest Man, 56 × 62 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Location unknown: formerly Broerman Collection, Brussels. Ref. Leppert (1977: 75). A rustic street musician plays a small duct flute (possibly a recorder) with four finger holes visible.
  • Diogenes in the Market-Place with a Lantern, Looking for an Honest Man (1642), Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Dresden: Stadtmuseum. Ref. Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2001). A child blows a pipe, gripped in his right hand with the little finger supporting the instrument underneath. The mouthpiece is beaked but there are no other identifying details.
  • Diogenes Looking for an Honest Man (ca 1650), oil on canvas, 120 × 162 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Amsterdam: Douwes Fine Art. Possibly identical to the above. In the centre of a very crowded market-place stands Diogenes with his lamp. To the left a child blows a pipe, gripped in his right hand with the little finger supporting the instrument underneath. The mouthpiece is beaked but there are no other identifying details.
  • The Judgement of Midas [Musical Contest between Apollo and Pan], canvas, 116 × 154 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Ghent: Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Cat. 1902-D. Ref. Leppert (1977: 78, pl. XVIII). Pan plays an ambiguous conical pipe (probably a shawm); Apollo plays a lyre; a child plays a shawm; there is a raft made up of seven small duct flutes (flageolets or recorders) with five finger holes visible on each.
  • Apollo and Pan, canvas, 119.0 × 107.5 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Dessau: Staatliches Museum Schloss Mosigkau, Inv. 98 C 2852. Ref. Leppert (1977: 81). A musical contest in Parnassus in which Apollo plays a fiddle and Pan an ambiguous conical pipe (shawm or recorder); one of the Muses plays a viol; others play duct flutes (flageolets or recorders) with two or three finger holes visible, a lyre lies unplayed. Timolus points to Apollo, awarding him victory. Behind Timolus, King Midas, already sprouting asses ears, indicates his preference by pointing to Pan.
  • Apollo and Pan, oil on panel, 49.5 × 71.4 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). New York: Sotheby’s Sale 8712, 27 January 2011, Lot 268 (bought in). Ref. Blouin Art Sales Index (2012, col.); Rijksbureau voor Kunsthistorische Documentatie, illustration 341856 (2014, col.) Seated opposite each other in a glade, Apollo and Pan face off in musical battle. They are surrounded by an audience of nymphs and satyrs, some of whom seem more interested in each other than in the contest. Midas, recognizable by his enormous asses ears, points towards Pan who is still tootling away on his pipe, a flared-bell model which might represent a recorder. Timotheus points to Apollo’s lyre on the ground indicating his choice of victor.
  • Mythological Subject, canvas, 119 × 182 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Ghent: Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Cat. 1903 F. Ref. Leppert (1977: 81). A countryside bacchanal in which one of the participants plays an ambiguous pipe (small shawm or recorder).
  • Parable of the Prodigal Son (ca 1640), canvas, 236 × 369 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Dresden: Stadtmuseum, Cat. 1011. Ref. Leppert (1977: 81); Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2001). A rustic countryside scene in which a child shepherd or peasant plays a soprano recorder. There is a hole beneath the little finger, probably slightly offset to the player’s left, and an incised decorative ring near the bell end.
  • Peasant at his Porridge, canvas, 190 × 210 cm, Jacob I Jordaens (1593–1678). Kassel: Schloss Wilhelmshöhe, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Cat. 105. Ref. Leppert (1977: 81). At a rustic domestic meal a peasant child plays with a small duct flute (flageolet or recorder) with three finger holes visible.
  • Adoration of the Shepherds, canvas, 180 × 179 cm, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Amsterdam: Collection Jonkkeer W. Six. Ref. Paris RIdIM (1999). Shepherds and beasts crowd around the Holy Family, including a woman with a wicker basket (? bird cage) on her head. On the rhs a very young boy tootles on a very small pipe, probably a duct flute (flageolet or recorder).
  • Allegory of Fecundity, drawing, 23 × 20 cm, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). New York: Metropolitan Museum, Robert Lehman Collection. Ref. Paris RIdIM (1999). Surrounded by dancing putti and naked women, a satyr plays a flared-bell pipe under a tree. No finger holes are visible, but the symbolism is suggestive of a recorder.
  • Family Concert, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Brussels: Collection Cavens. Ref. Paris RIdIM (1999). A woman holding her baby daughter is entertained by other members her family: a man and a woman sing accompanied by a girl playing on a flared-bell duct flute (flageolet or recorder) only three finger holes of which are visible; the family dog howls. A parrot looks on from the side.
  • Adoration of the Shepherds, oil on canvas, 195 × 122.5 cm, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Lyon: Musée des Beaux-Arts, Inv. A57. Ref. Joconde Website (1999). A biblical scene depicting shepherds carrying a basket, a hen, a bowl of milk, and a duct flute; St Joseph as an old man with his staff; and a smiling boy blows a fire. Not seen.
  • Adoration of the Shepherds (1657), oil on canvas, 270.0 × 205.7 cm, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Raleigh: North Carolina Museum of Art, Inv. 55.7.1. Ref. Website: North Carolina Museum of Art (2001, col.) A large altarpiece which includes not only the shepherds who followed the angels to the site of the Nativity, but also their families and farm animals. In the bottom right-hand corner, beside a magnificently painted goat, a small child pipes on a slightly flared-bell instrument that could be a recorder.
  • Flute-playing Shepherd, red crayon on paper, 21.5 × 11.5 cm, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Location unknown; sold Sotheby’s, Amsterdam, 9 November 1999, Lot 140. Ref. Rijksbureau voor Kunsthistorische Documentatie, Image  0000065087 (2010, b&w); Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2001). A bearded shepherd stands holding a soprano-sized pipe (possibly a recorder) with a slightly flared foot with a turned ornamental bead.
  • Venus and Cupid with a Fluteplayer (ca 1640), oil on canvas, 33 × 38 cm, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Location unknown; auctioned Sotheby’s (London), Sale W02803-242, 16 April 2002 (sold); Sotheby’s (London), Sale L01125, 13 December 2001, Lot 121. Ref. Burger (1859: 79–80, footnote); Bender (2010: 79); Wikigallery (2012, col.); Mutalart.com (2012, col.) Venus, wearing a string of pearls, has Cupid on her lap who reaches across her breasts. Behind them in the shadows a man plays a slender, conical duct flute, probably a recorder. Burger (loc. cit.) notes that this was amongst works by Jordaens sold in The Hague in 1734.
  • Der Breiesser [? Porridge eater] (ca 1650), oil on canvas, 191.0 × 210.5 cm, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Kassel: Staatliche Museen, Inv. GK 105. Ref. Munich RIdIM (2009, Kskg – 28). In vine covered arbor outdoors, a family are grouped around a table with food and drink. In the middle, a fat man who eats from a bowl right next to a woman with a child in her lap. In the background is an elderly woman-servant. To the left, a man drinks from a jug. On the far right, a baby on the floor crawls towards a small pipe, possibly a recorder. The title seems obscure. Not seen.
  • The Five Senses, painting, attributed to Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Location unknown. Website: gallica (2012, b&w). A young woman with a small child holds an apple in one hand and a rose in the other. Opposite her a young man plays a recorder, left hand uppermost, the beak, window/labium and quite strongly flared bell well-depicted. Between and behind them an older woman appears to be expressing milk from her right breast. Two shadey figures in the background look on.
  • The Feast of Venus, studio copy after Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Wolfenbüttel: Schloss Wolfenbüttel , ‘Parade’. Ref. Anthony Rowland-Jones (pers. comm., 2001). “As in Titian’s Worship of Venus, the goddess is a statue in a grotto with hosts of flying amoretti, forming a sort of ring. At the right of the picture a faun plays a pipe, in a a position – lips, cheeks, arms, hands (left hand lowermost) and fingers – as if it were a recorder, but no details are evident on the instrument itself” (Rowland-Jones, loc. cit.)
  • Interior with an Old Couple and Child Playing the Pipe, pen and brush in sepia, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, Inv. 1975.1.834 Ref. Constance Old (ex Amanda Pond, pers. comm., 2002, b&w). An old man and woman dining at a table are amused by a child in a high-backed chair playing a slender, flared pipe, quite possibly a recorder.
  • The Party (c. 1650), oil on canvas, 191 × 210.5 cm, Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). Kassel: Staatliche Museen, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Inv. GK 105. Ref. Munich RIdIM, Image Kksg – 28 (2013, b&w). Beneath an outdoor pergola is a family grouped around a table with food and drink. Seated in the middle, a fat man eats from a bowl. Beside him, a woman with a child on her lap points to a goat foraging for scraps beneath the table. In the background a serving woman holds a tankard. On the left, a man drinks from a jug. On the ground at the far right, a toddler holds a small duct flute to its mouth.
  • Pan Playing the Flute (ca 1680), engraving 34.0 × 42.5 cm, Schelte Bolswert after Jacob I. Jordaens (1593–1678). London: Royal Academy of Art, Inv. 03/2701; Washington: National Gallery of Art; Antwerp: Museum Plantin-Moretus, Prentenkabinet PK.OP.18033 | IV/B.187; London: Bonhams (New Bond Street), Sale 11438 – Prints, 29 November 2004, Lot 28. Ref. Website: gallica (2012, b&w). Surrounded by sheep and goats, Pan sits at the foot of a tree playing a cylindrical pipe, his fingers well disposed for recorder-playing. A caption beneath reads:

Pan sedit et viridi ridens sub tegmine fagi,
Depromit sepidos gutture Dulce sonos.

Festio quatiens terram pede, gaudi singit,
Grex tener; et placido gramina dente segit.

Ludwig von Jupan [Meister Loedewich]

German sculptor active in Marburg, Frankenberg, Kalkar and again in Marburg (1486), died Marburg (1538).

  • Marienaltar, centre panel: Assumption of Mary with Angelic Concert (1506–1508), carved wood, Ludwig von Jupan (op. 1486–- m.1538). Kalkar: Nicolaikirche, Marienaltar. Ref. Website: Anges Musiciens (2010, col.) Mary is borne upwards by angels. Beside her, angels play triangle, harp, psaltery, and a conical pipe with a hint of a window/labium, possibly a recorder. Beneath, angels sing and play shawms, handbells, and a cornetto.