Recorder Home Page Databases

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Abbreviation
Surname
Given Name
Dates
Provenance
Notes
 
Barth Barth R. c. 1900 Stuttgart, Germany A 4-keyed soprano recorder by this maker is currently offered for sale by Jean-Michael Renard.

Recorders by R. Barth
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Gedney Gedney Caleb bap. 1726 – m. 1769 England Advertisment in London Evening Post, 21 November 1754 mentions Travers or German flutes of all Sizes, English flutes ditto (Lasocki 2012). There is a bassoon by Gedney in the Horniman Museum, London, Inv. 14.5.47/205; and there is a two-keyed tenor oboe (taille de hautbois) in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. He is also said to have made clarinets.

The English maker Thomas Stanesby Jr bequeathed his tools to his apprentice Caleb Gedney on condition that he marry Stanesby's widow!
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Brown Brown George fl. 1716–1766 Germany, Ireland, England First mentioned in a Dublin newspaper of 1754. Although he still listed 'Common flutes' his specialities were transverse flutes, a detachable mouthpiece for focussing the tone on these instruments and cane transverse flutes. By 1753 he had moved to London.

From Dublin, Brown made forays to Oxford, where he advertised in Jackson's Oxford Journal (20 November 1754)that he 'MAKES all Sorts of Wind Musical Instruments in the greatest Perfection, true and pleasant toned … Hautboys, Bassoons, Clar[i]nets, and Common Flutes … especially a good Concert Common Flute which is the Foundation of all Instruments.

In the Daily Advertiser, 1 January 1766, Brown noted that he was esteemed by great Judges to be a complete Master of his Trade, having practised that Art in Germany (his native Country) and in England, for near 50 Years past (Lasocki 2012).
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Mason Mason John f. 1754–1778 ?London Mason advertised in the Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser, 26 January 1756 that he had invented the C-foot for the transverse flute, a claim that was refuted by both Gedney and Charles Schuchart (John Just’s son). The newspapers reveal more about Mason’s career. In 1765 he advertised that he assures the Public, he has been Fife-maker to his Majesty’s three Regiments of Guards these 18 Years … He makes the most curious German and Common Flutes, Fifes, Hautboys, Clarinets, Bassoons, Vox Humanes, &c. his Work being well known, and used through all Parts of his Majesty’s Dominions Abroad and at Home.

Mason was in the midst of another dispute: this time with Brown and the Irish maker Henry Colquhoun (d. 1791) over who had invented the detachable mouthpiece for the transverse flute as well as the bass (more likely alto or tenor) flute (Lasocki 2012).
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Colquhoun Colquhoun Henry d. 1791 Ireland In the Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser, 20 February 1765. Colquhoun claimed to have invented the detachable mouthpiece for the transverse flute as well as the bass (more likely alto or tenor) flute. Colquhoun, who also claimed to be fife maker to the Guards, said he makes and sells all Kinds of Wind Instruments, as Bassoons, Hautboys, German and Common Flutes, &c. &c. for Exportation or Home Consumption (Lasocki 2012). View
Cahusac Jr Cahusac Thomas b. 1756 Reading, Berkshire An undated trade card of Thomas Cahusac Sr. (1714-1798) offers Common Flutes of all Sizes. around 1787, his young son Thomas Cahusac Jr. b. 1756) set up a workshop in Reading, Berkshire, about 40 miles west of London. He advertised that he Manufactures and sells every article in the musical line as cheap as in London; and all istruments bought of him, if not approved of may be exchanged after one week’s trial. German flutes from 7s 6d to 6l 6s … Common Flutes 2s 6d to 6s each. Fifes from 1s to 7s each … This advertisement is useful in showing us the relative price of transverse flutes, recorders, and fifes. A year later, Cahusac Jr advertised Common Flutes and Fifes of all sizes … (Lasocki 2012).

Recorders by Cahusac Sr or Jr
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Astor Astor   1752–1813 Germany, London George Astor (1752-1813) arrived in London from Germany by 1778 and established himself as a flute maker. By the mid-1790s he had vastly expanded his business to manufacturing, making and selling instruments of all kinds, but specially wind and keyboard instruments. His range of goods is illustrated by his detailed catalog dated 1799, in which the following entries are relevant for our purposes:

A Flute, tipp’d with Ivory, 6 silver Keys, and extra Joints / Ditto, 5 silver Keys / Ditto, 4 ditto / Ditto, 6 Brass ditto, and extra Joints / Ditto, 5 ditto / Ditto, 4 ditto / Ditto, French flagelet …

The 'dittos', employed to save typesetting costs, are difficult to understand at first sight. But these entries show that Astor was selling … recorders at the normal level, presumably alto, as well as a second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth and octave higher (Lasocki 2012).
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Mousseter     fl. c. 1800 Paris Waterhouse (1993).

Recorders by Mousseter
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Bauman Bauman   op. c. 1720–1730 Germany I would appreciate further information about this maker

Recorders by Bauman
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Hanson Hanson Carl "Dudley" -1968–2014 Yorkshire, England Renaissance recorders after Agricola, Virdung, Praetorius; Ganassi recorders; also flutes after Mersenne and baroque flutes.

Hanson, S. (2014). Obituaries: Carl (Dudley) Hanson. Recorder Magazine 34(3): 97.
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Rahma Rahma   20th century Jallais, France Appears to have been an organisation marketing plastic neo-baroque & school recorders made elsewhere. View
Béthune Béthune Marie-José op. 1980s Cambrai, France Active in the 1980s. She was mentioned in an old French magazine between 1981 and 1983 (Jean-Luc Manguin, pers. comm. 2014). View
Boisselot Boisselot Pierre 20 January 1750 Montpellier Instrument maker and toy maker.
Married Marguerite Comte, 7July 1772 at Montpellier. Member of a family of turners, luthiers, piano makers and toymakers.
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JBSchöllnast Schöllnast Johann Baptist 19C Pressburg (Bratislava) 1-keyed soprano csakan in D at A=440 offered for sale on eBay May 2015, item 141661030810. belonged to an old archivist of Filarmonic Orchestra, from a private museum in Vienna. Ebony body, one key, german silver key and ring, tunable in two pieces; total length 300 mm; sounding length 25.7 mm. View
Montazeaud Montazeaud       Nothing is known of this maker. His only instrument is stamped: MONTAZEAUD | [globus cruciger]
de Avena Braga (2015: 31-32, footnote 123
Instrument by Montazeaud here
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KruspeFC Kruspe Franz Carl 1808-1885 Mühlhause & Erfurt Woodwind instrument maker Franz Carl Kruspe (1808-1885) founded his workshop in Mühlhausen in 1829, moving to Erfurt in 1836. His son, Friedrich Wilhelm (1838-1911) was trained by his father and later took over the workshop.. His son, Eduard (1871-1919) took over the workshop in the third generation. After the latter's death, the workshop and brand-name passed to Gottlob Hermann Huüller in Schüneck, also a maker of woodwind instruments, in partnership with his sons Max, Oskar, Kurt, Hermann and Wilhelm.
Although the Franz Carl Kruspe worshop id not make recorders they did make csakans. For an example see here
Thalheimer (2013: 72-73)
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Jahn Jahn Wilhelm Jr op. 1920-1936 Zwota, Germany A musical instrument making family dating back to the 19th century. Friedrich Wilhelm Jahn, who died before 1880, was a harmonica maker. His son, Friedrich Wilhelm Jahn Jr. (1859-1940 registered as a maker of wodwind instruments in 1880 and, in 1907, as a maker of woodwind instruments. Two of his sons, Wilhelm (1880-1949) and Karl August (1882-1969), were also employed in the workshop. Wilhelm, the elder son, inherited the family house which also included the workshop, and took this over as well. Wilhelm Jahn's second son, Kurt Wilhelm (1910-1941), also seems to have been employed in the workshop before the War.

6-8 instrument makers were employed at the Jahn workshop producing mainly recorders and some bassoons. The recorders were mostly supplied to the form of Gustav Herrnsdorf in Markneukirchen, but also to C.W. Moritz (Berlin), G. Mollenhauer & Söhne (Kassel), C.W. Meisel sen., Klingenthal (brand name "Cyclop") and others. Jahn also produced special models for Herrnsdorf, e.g. recorders with a plastic-sleeved beak, recorders in C with a B foot, recorders with a key operated by the little finger of the uppermost hand for producing a note pitched below the fundamental, and a rather elegant double key for the lowest note of a basset recorder.

Thalheimer (2013: 60).

Recorders from the Jahn workshop
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Uebel Uebel   19-20 C Wohlhausen, Markneukirchen 1878 - 1936 Company F.G. Uebel in Wohlhausen (clarinet construction company).
1936 F. Arthur Uebel in Markneukirchen and G. Rudolf evils in Wohlhausen.
After the death of F. Arthur Uebel his nephew G. Rudolf Uebel took over the workshop. In all three workshops produced recorders.
F. Arthur Uebel produced recorders until 1963 for the handler Wilhelm Herwig (Herwiga).
After 1963 Werner Uebel (nephew of F.A. Uebel), took over recorder production or Herrnsdorf. G. Rudolf Uebel (1915-1991) often used the upturned surname on his instruments: Lebü.
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EL-Schlosser Schlosser Ernst Ludwig 1905-1973 Zwota, Germany Member of a family of woodwind makers from the Vogtland area of eastern Germany who made recorders for Hermann J. Moeck (including the 'Tuju' model) Hans Jordan, August Richard Hammig, and others, and it is not possible to say which of their unbranded instruments originated in their workshops. However, those of Heinrich Oskar, "the black", and his descendents are often recognizable.

Schlosser family members who made recorders include:

Gustav Adolph Schlosser (1845-?)
     Heinrich Oskar Schlosser (1875-1935), "der weisse"
          Ernst Paul Schlosser (1905-1965)
          Siegfried Schlosser (*1934)
Johann Gabriel Schlosser Jr (1835-1894)
     Heinrich Oskar Schlosser (1875-1947), "der schwarze"
          Ernst Ludwig Schlosser (1905-1973
               Rüdiger Schlosser (1934-2005)
          Erich Oskar Schlosser (196-c.1943)

The two cousins who shared the same name were distinguished by their hair colour.
Thalheimer, P. (2005; 2008: 176-183; 2013: 80-81)

Recorders by Ernst Ludwig Schlosser
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R-Schlosser Schlosser Rüdiger Schlosser 1934-2005 Zwota, Germany Member of a family of woodwind makers from the Vogtland area of eastern Germany who made recorders for Hermann J. Moeck (including the 'Tuju' model) Hans Jordan, August Richard Hammig, and others, and it is not possible to say which of their unbranded instruments originated in their workshops. However, those of Heinrich Oskar, "the black", and his descendents are often recognizable.

Schlosser family members who made recorders include:

Gustav Adolph Schlosser (1845-?)
     Heinrich Oskar Schlosser (1875-1935), "der weisse"
          Ernst Paul Schlosser (1905-1965)
          Siegfried Schlosser (*1934)
Johann Gabriel Schlosser Jr (1835-1894)
     Heinrich Oskar Schlosser (1875-1947), "der schwarze"
          Ernst Ludwig Schlosser (1905-1973
               Rüdiger Schlosser (1934-2005)
          Erich Oskar Schlosser (196-c.1943)

The two cousins who shared the same name were distinguished by their hair colour.
Thalheimer, P. (2005; 2008: 176-183; 2013: 80-81)

Recorders by Rüdinger Oskar Schlosser
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