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Title
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Quote
 
1914   A Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Words especially from the dramatists. Edited with additions by A.L. Mayhewn. Oxford University Press. Walter W. Skeat record, to sing, to warble; applied esp. to the singing of birds. Two Gent, v. 4, 6; Pericles, iv, Gower; Beaumont and Fl., Valentinian ii. 1; Browne, Brit. Past. ii 4. As sb. - recorder ..., Puttenham, Eng. Poesie (ed. Arber, p. 79); Two Noble Kinsmen, v. 1. 142

recorder, a kind of flageolet or small flute, so named because birds were taught to 'record' by it.
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1650 unknown Anthropometamorphosis: 92 (1650) John Bulwer (1606-1656) In the curious Machin of speech, the Nose is added as a Recorder, to advance the melodius echo of the sound. View
1755 unknown Dictionary of the English Language ... Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) Recorder: "3. A kind of flute, a wind instrument.
... ...
In a recorder the three uppermost holes yield one tone, which is a note lower than the tone of the first three."
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1590   The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia. London: William Ponsonbie. Book 2, Chapter 21 Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586) The shepherds attending vpo[n] PHILISIDES went amo[n]g the[m], & sa[n]g an eclogue; one of the[m] answering another, while the other shepheards pulling out recorders (which possest the place of pipes) accorded their musick to the others voice. View
1595 1601 Plinie, Book VII, Chapter 56: The first inventers of diverse things Philemon Holland (1552-1637) "The flute and the single pipe or recorder were the inventions of Pan, the son of Mercurie." View
1621   Triton's Trumpet for the Four Seasons, a poem in praise of the musical accomplishments of Milton's father by his friend Lane., British Museum MS Reg. l7.B XV.f.179b. John Lane "At this full point, the Ladie Musickes hand,
Opened the casements, wheare her pupills stand,
To whome liftinge that signe, wch kept the time,
Lowde organs, cornets, shaggbutts, viols chime,
Lutes, cithernes, virginals, and harpsichords,
Flutes, violins, and softlie touchd recordes,
Bandoraes, orpharions, statelis grave,
Otherboes, classhers, sweetest of the thrave,
And everie instrument of melodie,
Wch mote or ought exhibite harmonie,..."
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1802 unknown Chronicle of Scottish Poetry: From the Thirteenth Century, to the Union of the Crowns, Volume 4 James Sibbald Recordar a small common flute View
2015 unknown unknown Ted Alexandro (1969--) THE RECORDER

So, I used to be a music teacher. I used to teach K-5 music here in New York City. I taught the recorder. Are you guys familiar with Satan's little flute? If there's music in Hell, I assure you, it is played on a recorder.
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1503 c.1549 Clariodus, Advocates MS 19.2.5, National Library of Scotland   When silence beine of wind and minstrellie,
And burd beine servit by and by,
The luitis beine sayit and stringis,
The squyeris dansing alway in the springis;
The harpis beine sayit a the full,
To make hartis mirrie tha war dull;
The Guthtrone with triumph did record;
The cleare symball with the mirrie cord;
The Dulcat playit also with portatiue,
Sad hevie myndis to make exultatiue.
The dulse base fiddell with the recordour,
Assayit war, and set at ane missoure;
Out of Irland there was ane clerscheo.
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1689 unknown Ode Z322: Celestial Music Did the Gods Inspire Henry Purcell Her charming strains expel tormenting Care
And weakened natures wasted strength repair.
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2009 unknown Lost City of Z: The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon. Doubleday, New York David Grann On one of his quests Fawcett's group was depressed and collapsed at the end of a very hard day.

Page 116: "Percy, to encourage merriment ... pulled a recorder from his pack and played 'The Calabar', a gallows humor Irish folk song about a shipwreck." James Murray (famous for exploring the Antarctic) hadn't heard the song in 30 years and joined along singing: "Costin....took out his own recorder. Manley lay listening, as the sound of their voices and instruments drowned out the howl of monkeys and the whir of mosquitoes. For a moment, they seemed, if not happy, at least able to mock the prospect of their death."

Page 134: Another reference (this time about parasitic bot flies growing in Murray's arm), but Fawcett talks about his 'flute', possibly another reference to the recorder. "The Echolas tribe were even adept at removing the maggots that had tortured Murray: "They would make a curious whistling noise with their tongues, and at once the grub's head would issue from the blowhole," Fawcett wrote. "Then the Indian would give the sore a quick squeeze, and the invader was ejected." He added, "I sucked, whistled protested, and even played the flute to mine, with absolutely no effect."
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