MakerAdler-Heinrich Blockflötenbau GmbH
CountryGermany
Address 1Kürten-Busch
Address 2
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Instruments- Scholar, sSATB wooden recorders for students
- Kids, a two-piece wooden soprano recorder for children
- Ecole, three-piece wooden soprano and alto recorders, voiced by Res Neuenschwander
– Vogtland, a full-sounding two-piece soprano recorder available in maple or plastic
– Venus, a two-piece wooden soprano recorder for beginners
– Weltmeister, a two-piece wooden soprano recorder painted in bright colours
– Scholar, a family of recorders (sSAT) designed for beginers
– Filius recorders, an entire family of recorders (sSATB) designed specifically for players with smaller hands
– Royal recorders, a family of recorders (sSATB) which represent a further development of the instruments first made by Alexander Heinrich in 1928
– Triple recorders, a family of recorders (SAT) of distinctive exterior design
– Arte recorders, a family of recorders (sSATB) which includes a tenor with an optional c# key operated by the little finger of the left hand
– Meister, a family of neo-baroque recorders (sSATB) which represent a further development of the instruments first made by Alexander Heinrich in 1928
- alto after Johann Benedikt Gahn
– Trichterflöten or bell recorders
– Hirtenflöte (shepherd's flute, a soprano recorder of narrow & short bore proportions)
NotesThe two Vogtland companies Johannes Adler and Alexander Heinrich merged prior to the dismemberment of the DDR. However, they ceased production in 2007. Some of their designs continued to be made for a while by Ulrich Hahl who set up an independent workshop of his own but that, too, soon failed.

The new Adler-Heinrich bell recorders designed by Klaus Grunwald were similar in appearance to renaissance recorders, with a wide, largely cylindrical bore, a simple external profile, and large single tone holes with a raised tone-hole for the lowest finger. But their most striking feature was their large, flared, wooden or metal bell. Thus they differed radically from traditional designs. These instruments were said to produce an extremely loud, full sound from bottom to top, and offer a wide variety of alternate fingerings which permit dynamic variation. It was claimed that a much greater range of breath pressures could be used than on traditional instruments, and that a remarkable variety of articulations was also possible, allowing them to compete successfully with loud modern instruments such as piano, saxophone. Soprano and alto models were available and there were plans to produce all sizes from sopranino to great bass in a variety of woods.